Everlasting by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

EverlastingEverlasting by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

It has been awhile since I even touched a romance novel, but I couldn’t resist. Kathleen E. Woodiwiss quickly became one of my favorite romance authors years ago when I was in my romance phase. I’m still drawn to her books and after reading this one have considered going back and rereading some others.

Woodiwiss redefined the historical romance genre, and every single book of hers I’ve read has become and instant favorite. This one is no different, and I ate it up very quickly. It’s hard to put down any of her books. I will say that for awhile I thought a couple details were glossed over or forgotten but the author picked them back up later, to which I was relieved. I hate when details are mentioned and then never referred to again.

In the end, the guys get the girls, some of them are pregnant, and everybody lives happily ever after. Such is the bumpy road of romance novels.

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Just After Sunset by Stephen King

Just After SunsetJust After Sunset by Stephen King

My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Stephen King is one of my most favorite authors and I love that he still writes short stories (and publishes them!). I’ve read another short story anthology by him and loved that one too. I can’t say that I’ve read anything from Mr. King that I didn’t like or love.

He explores several topics in this anthology, life after death, dreams, other dimensions, loss, and perilous situations. No two stories are completely alike and that gives this collection a nice flow. I’m glad the themes change from story to story.

He also includes a brief explanation of how the stories came to be, how he came to start writing short stories again, and the art of writing short stories. I love that too about Stephen King, he gives us a glimpse into the mind of a brilliant writer.

Horror stories aren’t for everyone, but if you’re a fan of the genre, you should be reading Stephen King.

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Blood Magick by Nora Roberts

Blood Magick (The Cousins O'Dwyer Trilogy, #3)Blood Magick by Nora Roberts

My rating: 3 of 5 stars

The conclusion to the Cousin’s O’Dwyer Trilogy is not what I thought it would be. Well, I did figure that the last couple would finally get their heads out of their butts and make a go of it, and I did figure that the main plot line would be resolved, but the little details that turned up I didn’t think would happen.

This trilogy is set up to follow three couples, so of course they end up engaged by the end of each book. No big surprise there. And because this couple are both witches, some rather exotic play time occurs. As with some of the other reviews on Goodreads, Branna does do a lot of cooking, but she did a lot of cooking in the other books too. We just get more of it since we’re focused on her now.

Anyway, as a wrap up, I like witches and sorcerers (even if they are named the Irish version of Kevin) and magick, and demons. So I liked it. It was fun to read about all the things they were doing and how they did it. Some of it was even based on what modern witches do. I liked that too. I’d read it again for fun sometime.

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Meet Me at the Library

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I’ve been to the library again. I broke out of my mold and picked up three books (which I shouldn’t have done because I was late returning them!). I picked up the next James Patterson book in the series I’m reading. I picked up a book from my favorite romance author, and a classic book I’ve never read.

The 3rd Degree by James Patterson

The Women’s Murder Club returns in a shockingly suspenseful thriller. Plunging into a burning town house, Detective Lindsay Boxer discovers three dead bodies…and a mysterious message at the scene. When more corpses turn up, Lindsay asks her friends Claire Washburn of the medical examiner’s office, Assistant D.A. Jill Bernhardt, and San Francisco Chronicle reporter Cindy Thomas to help her find a murderer who vows to kill every three days. Even more terrifying, he has targeted one of the four friends. Which one will it be?

Everlasting by Kathleen E. Woodiwiss

The reigning queen of historical romance, Kathleen offers her loyal audience an engrossing, medieval love story that is sure to delight them. Abrielle, a stunningly beautiful young lady dreads the marriage her stepfather has arranged. Desmond is an oafish, grotesque, yet wealthy squire and her greedy stepfather can’t see past his wealth. Luckily, a mysterious and handsome Scotsman, Raven, arrives. Abrielle and Raven sense an instant connection. Her beauty and intelligence and his dashing good looks and gentle demeanor complement each other. In an attempt to save the women he loves, Raven approaches Abrielle’s father to ask for her hand in marriage. He is rejected. Will their love prevail?

The Old Man and the Sea by Ernest Hemingway

It is the story of an old Cuban fisherman and his supreme ordeal: a relentless, agonizing battle with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream. Using the simple, powerful language of a fable, Hemingway takes the timeless themes of courage in the face of defeat and personal triumph won from loss and transforms them into a magnificent twentieth-century classic.

Have you been to your local library lately? What are you currently reading?

 

Keep reading little book worms!

From a Buick 8 by Stephen King

From a Buick 8From a Buick 8 by Stephen King
My rating: 4 of 5 stars

It has been ages since I’ve read a Stephen King book, and I don’t know why that is because I count Stephen King as one of my favorite authors. I rectified that by reading this book. I’m not much of a car person, though I do know a few bits and pieces, but this book doesn’t really get into the mechanics of a car.

If you couldn’t tell, the title gives the plot away. It’s all about a car, a Buick 8-cylinder Roadmaster, though it’s not an ordinary car, not with Stephen King. It’s a guys book, because it’s a car, and it’s the ’70s. But, it’s still a very good read, and there are a couple of females that comment on it. But the main narrator is a guy.

They story of the Buick is told in flashbacks, how the policemen of Troop D found it, what happened over the years, and then what happened just now, and then a bit later. This book has a long timeline, almost a good 4o years worth.

It’s not scary like Cujo, where there is an actual “monster” to contend with, this is much more subtle. Even so, with most Stephen King books there is an element of “this could happen to you” and that is present here, but it takes a little more believing. If you like Stephen King, if you like cars, if you like a good horror story, see if you can find this one.

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Spider’s Web by Agatha Christie

Spider's WebSpider’s Web by Charles Osborne

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

As with most books that are based on screenplays this book was relatively short to read. It was a wonderfully laid out who-dun-it by Agatha Christie who practically invented the genre. I’m not sure what else to say here as Agatha Christie is a very well known and classic author of the detective novel.

All I can really say is that I’ve been enjoying reading her books, plan to read more as I find them, and now that I’ve read “Spider’s Web” will be looking to find the screenplay version somewhere so I can watch how it plays out.

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Meet Me at the Library

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Another duo from my local library, 2 very different books – one by Agatha Christie, a classic mystery, another by Stephen King someone I’m surprised I haven’t read more of on this blog as he’s one of my favorite authors.

Spider’s Web by Agatha Christie

In the bestselling tradition of Black Coffee and The Unexpected Guest, a classic Christy mystery is finally available in novel form. Clarissa discovers a body in the drawing room and must hide it from her husband and the police while attempting to uncover the identity of the murderer.

From a Buick 8 by Stephen King

At first glance, Stephen King’s latest bears a familial resemblance to Christine , his 1983 saga of a haunted, homicidal Plymouth Fury. But From a Buick 8 is a marked departure from this earlier tale of adolescent angst and teenage tribal rituals. It is the work of an older, more reflective writer, one who knows that the most pressing questions often have no answers.

The story begins in western Pennsylvania in 1979, when a mysterious figure parks a vintage Buick Roadmaster at a local gas station, then disappears forever. The police discover that the Buick isn’t a car at all but rather a Buick-shaped enigma: self-healing; impregnable to dents, dirt, and scratches; composed of unidentifiable materials; and containing a completely nonfunctional engine. Confronted with a mystery of unprecedented proportions, the troopers of Barracks D claim the Buick for themselves and spend 20 years attempting to understand its nature, purpose, and provenance.

Over the years, the Buick is the site of a number of inexplicable occurrences, from occasional blinding “lightquakes” to more sinister happenings that suggest this alien object is a doorway to another dimension. King recounts the most dramatic of these with an intensity and attention to detail that evoke a primordial sense of terror, awe, and revulsion. Through it all, and despite the obsessive fascination of those around it, the Buick remains an impregnable mystery. And that, of course, is very much the point. The world, King tells us, rarely stops to explain itself. From a Buick 8 is one of King’s best, mostly tightly focused novels since The Green Mile . With great narrative economy, it encompasses 25 years in the interconnected lives of a diverse group of characters, and its unmistakable, deeply familiar voice is as haunting and engaging as ever. On the evidence at hand, it’s clear that King continues to command the hypnotic power that has made him one of the dominant figures in modern popular culture. Bill Sheehan

Keep reading little book worms!